Systolic heart murmur :S give a hand?


So i went to the docs the other day, and apparently he found i have a systolic heart murmur- anyone know what this is?
I'm booked contained by for some kind of heart 'echo' at the hospital in a few days. But just wondering if someone could afford me an idea?
btw, i'm 19, BMI of 20, no one in my kinfolk has a history of heart disease or anything.
Thanks in advance!
Answers:
Generally nothing to verbs about so they do an ECG to make sure, the Dr. Will probably send you home and put in the picture you to come back in 6 weeks. Probably will tell you to walk back to a normal life, and to achieve plenty of exercise and reduce your salt intake. Not Sex is not considered exercise but will lower your BP.
Systolic murmurs: A systolic murmur occurs between the first and second heart sounds. Systolic murmurs may be normal or abnormal. They may be precipitate, mid, or late systolic, or holosystolic (pansystolic). Systolic murmurs may be divided into ejection, regurgitant, and shunt murmurs.
Ejection murmurs are due to turbulent forward flow through narrowed or irregular valves or outflow tracts (eg, due to aortic or pulmonic stenosis).
Regurgitant murmurs represent retrograde or abnormal flow (eg, due to mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, or ventricular septal defects) into chamber that are at lower resistance.
Shunt murmurs may originate at the site of the shunt (eg, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defects) or result from altered hemodynamics remote from the shunt (eg, pulmonic systolic flow murmur due to an atrial septal defect beside left-to-right shunt).
Systolic click-murmur syndrome relates to mitral valve prolapse.
Echocardiography will reveal the exact cause of heart murmur. Source(s): http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec07/ch069/ch…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systolic_mu…
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/…
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/…
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-m…
http://www.google.co.in/#hl=en&source=hp…
my daughter has a heart mummer and not ever had a problem .... keep on and see wot your results say
To make the diagnosis you will entail to wait for the result of your diagnostic test,(er which is why it is being done!)

Many murmurs are simple benign flow murmurs and the scan may be regular. Source(s): GP for more years than I care to remember
Thank you for the put somebody through the mill. And a very good question at that.

In my practice, I see several infantile patients like you who tell me during the interview that "I've been told I enjoy a heart murmur". Conversely, I've detected many subtle systolic murmurs in young patients for the first time, which may come across some as somewhat as a worrisome surprise to the lenient.

The incidental finding of a systolic murmur is common. I'm assuming that is how your physician had detected your murmur -- from a routine nouns of your heart and not from his/her concern about active symptoms (shortness of breath, chest pain, etc.).

Not adjectives systolic murmurs are pathologic, meaning they do not all have a sinister underlying inflict. In young otherwise healthy young associates, a majority of these murmurs turn out to be "innocent flow murmurs" that have no clinical significance. A common scenario is a young athlete who is physically stirring. Personally, I've had this type of murmur ever since I was your age, and I've been an avid jogger who's run several marathons. Certainly, if you've have no heart/lung symptoms, then the underlying murmur is likely benign.

However, having said that, within are two underlying disorders that I always keep in mind when I see a childlike woman with a systolic murmur -- anemia and mitral valve prolapse. Anemia can be inferred clinically and confirmed on blood testing. Mitral spigot prolapse can be detected on an echocardiogram.

Further, under the appropriate clinical suspicion in young patients, a disease of the heart valve called endocarditis (i.e., an infectious disease from intravenous drug abuse) or an autoimmune cause such as Libman-Sacks endocarditis (lupus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome) may be considered.

Otherwise, other valvular diseases of the heart are unlikely in a fine person of your age..

I wish you well. Please hang on to us updated. Source(s): My remote medical training.


Related Questions:
  • How can i gain rid of flem cough?
  • Worried around first dose of Levothyroxine (Synthroid)?
  • Gull bladder surgery..?!?
  • Rash after wax...? lend a hand!?
  • Help Help . facts give or take a few polio?
  • Diseases Conditions






    Copyright (C) 2007-2012 DCQnA.com All Rights reserved.     Contact us